Video Introduction to The New Learning Culture Approach and Course

You may giggle as you hear the beginning of this recording and that’s just right! Yes! Joy and warm-heartedness in education is possible, –alongside academic excellence!

Please keep that smile on your face as you join me onto a journey into the New Learning Culture:

Introduction to The New Learning Culture Approach & Course July 6, 2013 from Carmen Gamper on Vimeo.

With love,
Carmen gamper
Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

YAY! The NEXT NEW LEARNING CULTURE ONLINE COURSE is ready for YOU !

In this NLC ONline Course Cycle we will also discuss the NLC Approach in high schools, in addition to preschool, elementary and middle school.

In the NLC course you will explore the skills and resources needed to skillfully nurture child-directed learning:

– How to prepare YES environments
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– Which hands-on learning materials –such as Montessori materials, Froebel Gifts, Hengstenberg toys and many many more–, to choose, craft or purchase and how to introduce them to your children and students

– How to set healthy boundaries respectfully and how to help children find their own solutions to their conflicts

– How to apply non-invasive teaching skills

– How to give child-friendly lessons

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– Why and how to foster pretend play and imagination

– How to understand and nurture genuine needs
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– How to assess natural developmental stages and sensitive periods for infants, toddlers, children, adolescents, and teenagers

– How to care for your own needs and inner child

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– What to do when a child triggers you

– How to follow your heart’s guidance in your work with children! They represent the most delicate precious parts of ourselves .

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The NLC Course will gently nurture you in becoming a Learning Companion and bringing more and more joy and understanding to your life and work with children.

WEBINAR PROGRAM BRIEF:
Session 1 – The New Learning Culture Approach

Session 2 — Inspiration and Tools from Maria Montessori, Rebeca Wild, the Reggio Emilia Approach, Friedrich Froebel, Célestin Freinet, the Waldorf Approach, Non-Directive Play Therapy, the Forest Kindergarten, and Democratic Education

Session 3 – The Child in You is Important

Session 4 — Fulfilling Authentic Needs 1: Physical and Emotional Needs

Session 5 – Imagination and Free Play: The Self-Healing and Self-Educating Powers

Session 6 – Fulfilling Authentic Needs 2: Intellectual and Spiritual Needs

Session 7 – Inner Guidance and Healthy Boundaries

Session 8 – Setting Healthy Boundaries with Respect

Session 9 – Natural Child Development and Child-Directed Learning

Session 10 – Being a Learning Companion and Offering Non-Invasive Teaching

Session 11 – Creating Child-Directed Learning Environments

Session 12 – Overview of Hands–on Learning Materials especially to simplify Mathematics

Session 13 – The NLC School in Practice

Session 14 – The NLC Approach in Your Life: Conclusive Talk and Consultation

YOU CAN REGISTER NOW FOR THE NEXT ONLINE COURSE IN SEPTEMBER, 2013.

With joy,
Carmen Gamper
Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

Next New Learning Culture NLC ONLINE Training starts in May 2013

NEXT ONLINE COURSE STARTS IN MAY, 2013.

FREE INTRODUCTORY WEBINAR APRIL 27 AND MAY 1

Please RSVP for dial-in information: Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

Froebel Gift

WEBINAR PROGRAM BRIEF:

Session 1 — The New Learning Culture Approach
Session 2 — Inspiration and Tools from Maria Montessori, Rebeca Wild, the Reggio Emilia Approach, Friedrich Froebel, Célestin Freinet, the Waldorf Approach, Non-Directive Play Therapy, the Forest Kindergarten, and Democratic Education
Session 3 — The Child in You is Important
Session 4 — Fulfilling Authentic Needs 1: Physical and Emotional Needs
Session 5 — Imagination and Free Play: The Self-Healing and Self-Educating Powers
Session 6 — Fulfilling Authentic Needs 2: Intellectual and Spiritual Needs
Session 7 — Inner Guidance and Healthy Boundaries
Session 8 — Setting Boundaries with Respect
Session 9 — Natural Child Development and Child-Directed Learning
Session 10 — Being a Learning Companion and Offering Non-Invasive Teaching
Session 11 — Creating Inspiring Learning Environments
Session 12 — Hands–on Learning Materials especially to simplify Mathematics
Session 13 — The NLC School in Practice

CONCLUSIVE ONE-ON-ONE TALK: The NLC Approach in Your Life

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE DETAILED PROGRAM

REGISTRATION:

E-mail Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

DIY Montessori Spindle Box – same but different

I’m just back from a 6 week NLC consultation stay at the school of the Huichol Center for Cultural Survival founded by Susana Valadez, in Huejuquilla del Alto, in the Sierra Madre, Mexico. I consulted the teacher staff of their preschool and after school program, and we became friends in the process.

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Because the teachers have to work with very limited resources, we came up with lots of learning materials made of recycled and nature items.

To create a material similar to the Montessori Spindle Box, we took big bottle caps, numeral stickers, and beans:

bottle caps material

In addition to learning about matching numeral with bean amounts, children can also do simple addition. Just take two bottle caps full with beans that you would like to add to each other and pour them into a third cap that has no numeral sticker, then count the beans…

bottle cap addition

I shared with the teachers how to present materials with the Three-Period Lesson – and they loved it! So simple! So fun!

Stay tuned for more…we made Montessori materials with laundry clips, Froebel materials with plastic bottle rings, the Golden Beads with golden beans, and much more…

Best wishes,
Carmen Gamper
http://www.newlearningculture.com/workshops.html

New Learning Culture Online Training starts March 5, 2013

With great joy and due to enthusiastic demand, we are offering the first NLC ONLINE Training starting MARCH 5, 2013.

WEBINAR PROGRAM BRIEF:

Session 1 — The New Learning Culture Approach
Session 2 — Inspiration and tools from Maria Montessori, Rebeca Wild, the Reggio Emilia Approach, Friedrich Froebel, Célestin Freinet, the Waldorf Approach, Non-Directive Play Therapy, the Forest Kindergarten, and Democratic Education
Session 3 — The Child in You is Important
Session 4 — Fulfilling Authentic Needs 1: Physical and Emotional Needs
Session 5 — Imagination and Free Play: The Self-Healing and Self-Educating Powers
Session 6 — Fulfilling Authentic Needs 2: Intellectual and Spiritual Needs
Session 7 — Inner Guidance and Healthy Boundaries
Session 8 — Setting Boundaries with Respect
Session 9 — Natural Child Development and Child-Directed Learning
Session 10 — Being a Learning Companion and Offering Non-Invasive Teaching
Session 11 — Creating Inspiring Learning Environments
Session 12 — Hands–on Learning Materials especially to simplify Mathematics
Session 13 — The NLC School in Practice

CONCLUSIVE ONE-ON-ONE TALK: The NLC Approach in Your Life

froebel gift

FREE ONLINE INTRODUCTORY SESSIONS:
Tuesday, February 26:
11am PST, 2pm EST, 8pm Rome
Or by appointment

FOR DIAL-IN INFO RSVP TO: Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD DETAILED WEBINAR PROGRAM

WEBINAR SCHEDULE:
Starting March 5 until April 9, 2013 — from the comfort of your home
1 hour every Tuesday and Thursday for 7 weeks
13 hours live online training plus 1 hour conclusive personal consultation
(Exact time to be determined according to the group’s needs)

COURSE FEE: $ 600

REGISTRATION: E-mail Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

Lindenschule in Austria: A School inspired by Maria Montessori and Rebeca Wild

In May I went visit the Lindenschule in Innsbruck, Austria. One of the board members, Steve, showed me around the school environment. Here is what I saw…

A beautiful friendly house

A spacious, natural outdoor play area

A big dirt and water play area

A super-inspiring arts and crafts room with plenty of raw materials available

An elaborate block and pretend play area

An indoor water play space

Measuring and mixing containers

The kitchen prepared so that children can use it independently

A writing area

A friendly inspiring space for math, geometry, algebra with Montessori and other hands-on learning materials

Montessori math materials

Montessori beads materials

There were even more amazing environments…a huge indoor movement room, separate rooms for the preschool, an outdoor crafting and eating area…The environments are constantly adapted to the children’s genuine needs. At the moment over forty children use this school! Here is alink to their website www.lindenschule.at

I hope you are inspired! Let’s create similar schools here in the US!
Get in touch!
Carmen
www.newlearningculture.com
Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

The New Learning Culture School Model

The New Learning Culture school model (NLC model) can be used as a template for alternative schools based on self-directed and hands-on learning. This model is adaptable to any budget and culture. It can be used for home-schooling and classroom environments, from preschool to high school.

Rebeca and Mauricio Wild spearheaded this school model in their preschool through high school learning center in Ecuador. The Wilds shared their experiences in parent circles during their annual visits to Europe during the 1990s and 2000s. In fact, in Europe these schools are called Wild-inspired schools. Carmen Gamper is adapting this school model to the needs of the educators and families in the United States. She calls her personal development of the model the New Learning Culture Model. From her experiences in the European schools, she learned that the adult’s sacred child within needs to heal and learn together with the children. Deepened awareness of personal childhood conditioning prevents us from transferring personal wounds onto children and onto each other. Adults, just like children, need companions and willingness to honor their emotions.

Outdoor area, Lindenschule

Today, there are approximately one hundred and fifty schools adapting this model to their community’s specific needs. Schools have emerged especially in the German and Spanish speaking parts of Europe; Austria, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, South Tyrol (Italy), and Spain. Many of these parent-initiated schools were established in family houses with between five and thirty families participating; some schools serve over hundred families.

Preschool and kindergarten-aged children learn together in prepared environments. Elementary school children share their environments with middle school kids. In addition, middle school kids also have environments that are designed for them.

These schools offer intentionally prepared indoor and outdoor learning environments that change with the needs of the students. Each room is prepared for self-directed, hands-on learning. Each provides a great variety of hands-on materials developed by educators such as Montessori, Seguin, Nikitin, Steiner, Freinet, and many others, including new materials developed by the
parents. These materials cover the traditional elementary and middle school curriculum and more. In addition, children find ready for their independent use: tools from daily life, games, toys, art supplies, countable and uncountable objects, natural elements such as gardens, sand, dirt, water play, and more.

Lindenschule Innsbruck, Austria:

The hands-on materials are presented in structured environments. Depending on the size of the house, there will be a room or corner for math, language, foreign languages, history, geography, science, arts and crafts, music, imaginative and block play, theatre stage, wood shop, full kitchen ready to use, eating areas, as well as outdoor areas for academic study, play, free movement and more. The whole property may be designed according to the principles of permaculture. Children can move freely throughout these learning environments and decide spontaneously what they would like to do in the present moment. Everything a child does is seen as part of a learning process: movement, play, emotional processing, experiencing and resolving conflicts, resting, and of course working with the hands-on learning materials.

Teachers and/or parents, known as “learning companions,” are always present. They facilitate, inspire and assist learning processes. Learning companions make sure the children are not interrupted in their play or work, that healthy boundaries are respected, and that all things go back to their places. Through healthy boundaries and rules, we can allow the children as much freedom and independent movement as possible while everybody feels safe.

Guided lessons are provided as additional learning opportunities by the learning companions. Invited experts, such as a baker, policeman, or architect, guide lessons as well. Children can choose if they would like to participate in specific day-long or recurring weekly lessons. As children grow older, excursions to the adult environment are offered. Learning companions accompany children to the bank, doctor’s office, nursery, farm, and the like.

The whole school is structured to fulfill the child’s genuine needs for safe exploration, healthy boundaries, movement, play, hands-on and intellectual learning, communication, timelessness, emotional safety, tension release, and time in nature. The need for being witnessed and making personal choices is honored. Learning companions take responsibility for the environment and make sure that authentic needs can be fulfilled to the greatest extent possible.

Children learn in self-directed ways. Their spontaneous activities, curiosity, and genuine interests are regarded as the inner guidance that leads to appropriate learning opportunities needed in the moment. Learning companions respect the children’s genuine interests. All lessons and offerings are based on free choice.

Children feel safe to be who they are. In this way, disciplinary problems are minimized. Companionship and trust can develop between adults and children. With their respectful presence and the principles of non-violent communication, learning companions offer to accompany personal emotions as well as conflicts between children. In fact, some schools offer specific areas for these authentic internal growth processes. For example, a cozy, beautiful place for sadness, silent spaces for resting, a structured and safe place for friendly rough-and-tumble, and a place for chatting and eating.

Since children co-determine their learning process actively, these schools do without a pre-set curriculum. Children have a folder with a check-list of all topics and required skills of the curriculum. They cross a topic off the list each time they have mastered a subject. There are no involuntary tests, nor comparative grades. Educators give each student feedback on their personal progress. Goals can be reached within five to eight years.

These schools acknowledge that parents are deeply connected with their children. Learning companions share responsibility, concerns, and ideas with the parents. Parents are invited to participate in the school in many ways. Parents can choose to be learning companions on a regular basis at most of these schools. All situations, conflicts, and joyful events are received as opportunities to grow in understanding, awareness, and caring for all the children, parents, and learning companions involved. These schools are aware of the importance of providing a central point for community development. Community members are invited to share their skills at the school with the children and other adults. A community-based school like this fosters peace and productivity while eliciting the very best each participant has to offer.

Let’s bring this school model to the US. It responds to the genuine needs of many families looking for an educational environment that embraces the whole child and the whole family. We are currently planning a school K-5 in the S.F. Bay Area, Marin.

Get in touch for more information
Carmen@NewLearningCulture.com

With kind regards,
Carmen Gamper

Froebel USA 2012 International Conference August 4–5

Join us in San Francisco this August for a 2-day hands-on immersion into the original early childhood methods of Friedrich Froebel, inventor of Kindergarten. Registration fee includes catered lunch both days, plus beverage and snacks morning/afternoon. Presenters include co-host Carmen Gamper, Scott Bultman, Stacey Wellman, John Reynolds, Bruce Rawles, Finella Scholtz, Tiffeni Goesel, Bradford Hansen-Smith, and others.

The focus of this year’s conference is using the Froebel Gifts & Occupation materials with children in a modern setting (in classroom/homeschool and other environments). The content of the workshops will involve practical aspects of Gift Play, connections to the Occupations activities, the modern day use of the Mother Songs and movement games, as well as gardening and nature education. Attendees will work with experienced Froebel teachers and have many opportunities to play themselves. There will be many opportunities for networking and social interaction with other Froebelians.

Who should attend? This conference is aimed at a diverse and multidisciplinary audience, including art educators, math teachers, homeschooling parents, early childhood professors and practitioners, educational historians, and others. Attendance is extremely limited and early registration is encouraged.

The conference venue is the South San Francisco Conference Center, located close to the San Francisco International Airport (SFO) with easy access to mass transit. You are welcome to use the New Learning Culture promo code to receive a $100 discount: NLCFUSA2012

http://froebelusa.org/

The Rights of Children at Schools

In my work as an educational consultant, I have visited many schools all over the world. I have observed, in both traditional and alternative schools, that children’s basic rights are often ignored. I believe that all human beings, no matter how old they are, must be granted the right to take care of their bodily needs. The child’s body and whole organism are by nature determined to move and learn in specific ways. When we adults refuse to collaborate with the child’s natural development, we create immense, unnecessary suffering. Even seemingly harmless experiences such as occasionally being denied the right to go to the toilet when needed, can leave trauma and health problems that are carried into adulthood.

The widespread assumption that children should sit still and listen, has been repeatedly disproved by scientists, psychologists, and educators. Children are meant to move their bodies and play. This is how they learn best. Furthermore, children in all school models are still being discriminated against, shamed and punished for having different learning styles. Sadly, children who learn more quickly or more slowly than their peers are often neglected in the classroom. Sometimes, learning content simply is not interesting enough or even age-appropriate. If children are unable to relate to the subject matter or the way in which it is delivered, they naturally lose interest. Children are drawn toward classroom activities that are aligned with their stages of cognitive and emotional development.

The “school model” itself will not protect children from abuse. Every single teacher and parent needs to take responsibility for his or her own well-being and for the child’s well-being.

UNESCO’s Rights Of Children are very basic human rights (e.g., to protect children against child labor and violence, and secure their right for education). http://www.unesco.org/education/pdf/CHILD_E.PDF My list of children’s rights starts from the assumption that children are in an educational environment. I hope this list of rights will raise awareness for the subtle abuse and hidden suffering that occur in schools every day. If we allow children to feel more comfortable in learning environments, we adults will also feel better and happier! Instead of having to worry about being thirsty or feeling emotionally drained, children will consistently have their needs met. Children will gain the opportunity to experience true, authentic learning with joy. This leads to a lifelong love of learning.

THE RIGHTS OF CHILDREN AT SCHOOLS
by Carmen Gamper

All the children have the right to do the following:

1. Go to the toilet when needed.

2. Have drinking water available.

3. Move the body when needed.

4. Learn to take care of personal needs.

5. Learn and process emotions through play.

6. Learn through exploration, trial, and error.

7. Make mistakes and not be judged or shamed.

8. Learn at a personal pace.

9. Fully understand a subject before being tested.

10. Not to be tested involuntarily. Instead, share knowledge by free choice, only when ready to receive feedback on learning progress.

11. Not to be punished. Instead, children should be respectfully encouraged to become more self-disciplined.

12. Not to be compared with peers. Instead, acknowledged as an individual student with individual talents, opinions, and characteristics.

13. Not to be judged for being different.

This declaration will be available as a poster soon.

by Carmen Gamper
www.NewLearningCulture.com